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The Very Hungry Caterpillar

untitledEric Carle
Puffin
Age 0-5

This book, published in 1969, is a picture book classic. It tells the story of a greedy caterpillar searching for food. As the caterpillar nibbles its way through different foods, your child will not only enjoy the story but be introduced to the life cycle of a butterfly, the days of the week, practise their counting.

lovemybooksactivitiesorangecentre

Share the story

Read aloud
Read the story aloud, taking time to look closely at the pictures when your child wants to and pointing out the little egg on the leaf, the fruits and the different foods the caterpillar ate on the Saturday page as you do.

Join in
When you re read the book children might enjoy finishing the sentences eg ‘On Monday he ate…..’ they can pretend to be the caterpillar and poke a finger through the holes. Perhaps you could draw a face on a little finger to make this even more fun! Count the fruits together; pointing to them as you do.

Tell the story
Children could tell the story to you in their own words using the pictures to guide them. You might find that children read the words to the same rhythm when they read as you do or use some of the phrases they remember from the book.

Watch the story
Listen to Eric Carle, the author read the story of the Very Hungry Caterpillar.


Things to make and do

At the shops look  for different fruits, talk about them and buy some if you can. If you are lucky enough to be near a farm you could look at them growing or pick your own perhaps.

At home put some pieces of fruit in a row and count them together. How many bananas/apples do we have? Encourage children to taste different fruits, perhaps trying something they haven’t tasted before.

Play a  game Make up a word game with different things the caterpillar might eat eg ‘On Monday he ate one tomato’,On Tuesday he ate two bananas etc…’

Make playdough fruit Using playdough or plasticine create different fruits and foods together like the ones in the story. Talk about what you are doing with the playdough (rolling and squeezing) as you do.

Make a butterfly picture You need paper and  paint. Fold the paper in half and then open it out again. Your child can blob coloured paint along the fold line. Fold in half again and gently squeeze the paint between the paper towards the corners. Open out carefully to discover a beautiful colourful butterfly!

Be a butterfly spotter

Look out for butterflies when you are out and about and talk about their colours and how they move.


Find out more

Read more books by author/illustrator Eric Carle here

Titles include: Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? The Tiny Seed

Have You Seen My Cat? The Mixed Up Chameleon The Very Busy Spider

Talk about healthy and unhealthy foods

Talk about  healthy and unhealthy foods, what is best for caterpillars to eat – and what is healthy for humans too.

Find out more about butterflies and caterpillars here

Talk about the life cycle of a butterfly from the information you have found out. Children could draw the story of the butterfly’s life cycle on  a large circle of paper divided into four sections.

Cut out and collect pictures of butterflies and caterpillars from magazines and make a scrap book. Talk about the similarities and differences between them from the link above or information books.

Children who are very interested in caterpillars and butterflies might enjoy visiting a butterfly house if you have one nearby or even growing a butterfly from eggs – kits available from some educational suppliers.

Your book ideas and comments

Send us your comments on the books on the website that you have enjoyed, send in your comments, ideas and photos about activities linked to the books.

Jemma writes about reading with more than one child

Jemma has three children, Elodie (7), Finlay (4) and Orla (2)

 ‘We do struggle with this. Orla is at the stage where she just wants to turn the pages constantly, annoying the other two. We find we need to have more time for bedtime reading as they all want to pick a story each! Having a slot of reading time with each child individually helps, so they know they get some ‘one-on-one’ time.

Reading a story with vivid pictures, but perhaps more suited to older children often works, the younger children will ‘listen’ for the pictures, they may tail off and go and do something else but then the older one stays for the story.

It generally seems to be about the book as well, so the best ones that keep them all engaged,

and our age group favourites are Dear Zoo, Each Peach Pear Plum, Peace at Last, We’re Going on a Bear Hunt  and So Much. Interestingly all our children have loved these stories equally and all had ‘a time’ for them. This is without us promoting them also.

For example, each of them have had us read Dear Zoo 10 times a day between the ages of 9 months and a year! A firm favourite for all of them is so much and We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, all 3 of them will happily listen to that, even Elodie. Max at Night is also popular. Finlay (4) absolutely loves Alfie books, we read these a lot. I didn’t realise there was a video with Alfie Gets in First . I’ll show him that.

Jemma is interested in the new lovemubooks novels section.

Elodie (7) is an avid reader and reads books so quickly. I’m always on the lookout for new ones at the library or to buy but sometimes books that are suitable for her reading level are not always suitable in content. (They often have lots about boyfriends!)

Elodie has read Charlotte’s Web which she adored; she loved discovering what animal the characters were. She did find it sad though, I think it was the first book that really ‘moved her’, so that was interesting to see. She also became a vegetarian for a couple of days!

She read Mango and Bambang the not a pig in one sitting in an afternoon, I was a bit worried that she hadn’t read it properly but she recounted the whole story and loved it.

There are loads of books on your site that we like and some great ideas for new reads that we haven’t read on your new picture books list. [ http://www.lovemybooks.co.uk/our-top-10-new-books. This is such a great list for buying books as gifts for friend’s children!

It’s a lovely and very helpful website. Well done!’

 Tamiko wrote this:

‘I have just clicked onto LMB and LOVE it already! I have been reading The Hungry Caterpillar, The Gruffalo, Dear Zoo and other stories for the last 6 months to my son and I adore all your ideas on how to expand and develop the stories. Thank you for creating this website.’

We asked her how she was getting on with sharing books with her little boy Vincent who is now nearly one:

She has told us his favourite books are Dear Zoo and Spot’s First Easter (for pulling the flaps), The Very Hungry Caterpillar (for poking his fingers in the holes), Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy as he enjoys the rhymes, 100 First Animals for the variety and colour of the animals.

Tamiko continues:
‘We share Each Peach Pear Plum, Dear Zoo, Very Hungry Caterpillar, We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, Gruffalo, Peace at Last, Room on the Broom (the last is our favourite bedtime story). We often share books straight after breakfast for about 40 minutes on a good day! I have tried the lovemybooks ideas of singing along to the Bear Hunt song, and also saying lines from the book when having a bath for example (splash, splosh, splash splosh!)

I look forward to doing more Hungry Caterpillar games once he is a bit older. And all the other interaction and games of course! ‘

Thanks Tamiko! We look forward to hearing more about your reading together

untitledRecommendations from Rose, a grandmother
I’d like to recommend the Little Red Train series by Benedict Blathwayt. Each page is full of realistic but also whimsical detail, humorous and informative, with townscapes, country scenes and seascapes, exploring universal themes such as the tortoise and hare type of race (between trains), generous acts, cheating, rescue etc. I’ve just bought two: Race to the Finish and To the Rescue. Two others are: Runaway Train and Busy Day.  I notice that you include one book by him in the dinosaur section.
These were suggested by the bookshop in Muswell Hill  when I mentioned that both my grandsons Leo and Luke love the detail of the Richard Scarry books, but I don’t like having to ‘translate’ from the American, both the language and cultural references.  The Scarry books are full of humorous representations of urban busyness and different forms of travel, and have lots of recurring people/animals to find on each page. I’ve given a few to both Leo and Luke  (aged 3 and 2 and a half) for example, The Busiest People Ever and Cars and Trucks and Things that Go). But at the bookshop the assistant recommended the Little Red Train books as being similar in having lots of detail and having the theme of people helping, rescuing etc. I’ve used Race to the Finish  and both really liked it – I’m saving the Busy Day for later.
Another author I like is Alex T Smith: http://www.alextsmith.com/. He’s a young author and very popular, apparently.

It would be good to include on the site a section on local recommended bookshops. Mine would be: Children’s Bookshop, Fortis Green Road, Muswell Hill.

Lovemybooks
Thanks Rose for some great suggestions for books and for the website. Please write again about reading with your grandsons. We’d love to hear from you.

ROLE PLAY IS GREAT! -Emma
My daughter (aged two) engages most with role play activities around the books on the website. She has loved the ideas from the site such as packing a bag to ‘go on a bear hunt’ in the garden and ending up in bed under the covers, and is often now doing this on her own.  I overheard her saying” oh no! ‘I’ve got shoes on my mud like going on a bear hunt, squelch squerch!” See all the lovemybooks ideas for We’re Going on a Bearhunt.

She also had lots of fun with Dear Zoo activities, putting toy zoo animals into presents ‘from the zoo’ and sending them back. I recently gave her something to play with while I was tidying up and she promptly gave it back saying “send it back!” so I have decided not to play this one too close to Christmas to avoid awkward present giving situations!

She also gets very excited about having tiger tea parties (The Tiger Who Came to Tea) laying out all the food on a tray, wondering who is at the door and using a tiger puppet to eat all the sandwiches and buns and drink all the tea in the teapot. We then go round the kitchen so the tiger can eat all the food in the cupboards and drink all the water in the taps. We have even put on our coats to go to a pretend cafe, ordering food, paying the bill and then going to the shops to buy an extra large tin of tiger food!

Learning from these ideas in love my books has helped us to come up with our own activities. We read Peace at Last, going into different rooms in the house, listening to sounds like the clock ticking, the refrigerator and a dripping tap, saying “oh no! I can’t stand this!”

Lovemybooks:
Hi Emma – it’s really good that you’re enjoying role play with your daughter.
Role play –  playing out the story of a book – helps to develop imagination, play and language, a deeper understanding of stories AND builds interest and enjoyment of books.

LOVE MY BOOKS – Sarah Baker
We started reading to our baby when I was about 7 months pregnant. Partly as a bonding exercise (I’d read a piece on how babies can recognise their mum and dad’s voices) and partly because we’d already been given some lovely books and I wanted to revisit some of my childhood favourites.

Now he’s five months and we’ve been reading to Freddie ever since. It’s his dad’s turn at night for the last story of the day, usually a quiet one as part of his bedtime routine, but once morning comes around, it’s my turn and that’s when the activities start.

One of our favourites is Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar. It’s bright, the pictures are wonderful and the little holes are brilliant for tiny fingers to poke through and help turn the pages or pretend to be a caterpillar. At five months, Freddie is more of a listener than a reader, but in time we’ll get a little more interactive and try some of the brilliant suggestions on the Love My Books website.

As a writer for children and a voracious reader, I’m keen to encourage Freddie’s early love of books (whether listening to them or biting them) and the Love My Books website is a brilliant resource of both fun and educational activities to support that. They also have lots of book suggestions, some of which we didn’t know, so we’ve already ordered more. I foresee very happy times ahead (and not just for me!)

I look forward to working through the age group books and activities with Love My Books and our very own hungry caterpillar.

Read more of Freddie’s story

BUSES AND TRAINS! – Toyin
My little boy adores buses and trains. He absolutely loves Naughty Bus and Oi! Get Off My Train. He also loves a push, pull slide book called Busy railway (published by Campbell) and Wave the flag and Blow the Whistle (Ronda Armitage illustrated by Andrew Gordon.

Lovemybooks
Thanks for this feedback Toyin, great to see how much your little boy enjoys this topic!

 


 


 

 

 

 

Freddie’s story

Sarah Baker, a parent,  tells  the story of her son Freddie as he develops as a reader.

 

October 2015

Sarah writes:
We started reading to our baby when I was about 7 months pregnant. Partly as a bonding exercise (I’d read a piece on how babies can recognise their mum and dad’s voices) and partly because we’d already been given some lovely books and I wanted to revisit some of my childhood favourites.

Now he’s five months and we’ve been reading to Freddie ever since. It’s his dad’s turn at night for the last story of the day, usually a quiet one as part of his bedtime routine, but once morning comes around, it’s my turn and that’s when the activities start.

One of our favourites is Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar. It’s bright, the pictures are wonderful and the little holes are brilliant for tiny fingers to poke through and help turn the pages or pretend to be a caterpillar. At five months, Freddie is more of a listener than a reader, but in time we’ll get a little more interactive and try some of the brilliant suggestions on the Love My Books website.

As a writer for children and a voracious reader, I’m keen to encourage Freddie’s early love of books (whether listening to them or biting them) and the Love My Books website is a brilliant resource of both fun and educational activities to support that. They also have lots of book suggestions, some of which we didn’t know, so we’ve already ordered more. I foresee very happy times ahead (and not just for me!)

I look forward to working through the age group books and activities with Love My Books and our very own hungry caterpillar.


December 2015

Sarah writes:
Freddie’s already developing a real love for his favourites.

A few weeks ago, Freddie began crawling. He went from one side of the living room to the other, and right up to the bookshelves. There he began to pull out a few books before turning to me with a smile. I could not have been more proud. Now this has become part of our daily routine, and storytime by the bookshelves is as much fun for him as it is for his mum and dad.

Now he’s a little older, we’ve started including some of the activities Love My Books suggest on their website. We’ll often read one book a second time or point out little picture details as we go. We talk about the book and, when it comes to one of his new favourites, Orange, Pear, Apple, Bear by Emily Gravett, we’ve used real pieces of fruit to tell the story (which he found delicious).

We continue to find that the Love My Books website is a brilliant resource of both fun and educational activities. They also have lots of book suggestions, which would make brilliant Christmas presents!


March 2016
Freddie age 1 Year

Sarah writes:
Freddie turned one this month and his love of books is still going strong. He got quite a lot of book presents (the best kind of presents) and we read one or two, sometimes more each day. He’s now learned to turn the pages, though not necessarily at the right time, which often makes for interesting storytelling.

Freddie definitely has his favourites. These are the rhyming stories, the ones we can do actions to, the ones where I voice the characters, the ones where he can really join in. Reading books has become an interactive activity for us and it’s a source of endless giggles when I do the singing bits or we fly around the house, making room on our very own broom. (Room on the Broom LINK)

Two books we’ve really enjoyed lately are:

 Stomp, Chomp, Big Roars! Here Come the Dinosaurs!  by Kaye Umansky and Nick Sharratt

We’re big dinosaur fans in this house and the stomping and chomping is always fun. Freddie’s also recently learned to roar so I’m encouraging that at every opportunity.

Train! By Judi Abbott

This is a very funny book, which makes Freddie (and me) laugh every time we shout ‘Train!’ whether we’re reading or playing with our own little train set (carriages currently filled with toy animals, a car and what looks like a very hipster farmer). We’re planning a train trip of our own soon to see a friend in Edinburgh and I’m expecting a few shouts of ‘Train!’ as we travel. Sorry about that everyone…


March 2017
Freddie age 2 years

Sarah writes:
Freddie is 2 years old and his love of books grows with him. We have story time every day, usually after breakfast, and always before bed. Reading is something we do together. Freddie’s clear about which stories he likes and now refers to them by their title. He’s also started reciting bits of his favourites back to me during the day, so we both seem to be learning them off by heart.

Two of his current favourites are Rosie’s Walk by Pat Hutchins and The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle.

Freddie turns the pages so he’s in charge of how fast or slow we read. We’ve begun to pause a little, taking time to talk about ‘what’s going to happen next,’ using the space to discuss the fox following Rosie. We count the items The Very Hungry Caterpillar eats and Freddie names them. As these are favourite books, we read them over and over, and I often suggest to Freddie that he read them to me and he really enjoys telling me his version of what’s going on. He’s also become very interested in the words themselves, asking me what a particular word ‘says’ and then repeating it. It’s astonishing and magical to watch.


September 2018
Freddie’s dinosaur adventures

Author and parent Sarah Baker continues her son Freddie’s reading journey. Freddie is now 3 and Dinosaur stories are a big hit. This is what Sarah has to say:

‘We love dinosaurs and we love dinosaur books. We currently have four favourites, which we read again and again, and they inspire a lot of play too.’

Dinosaur Roar! by Paul Stickland & Henrietta Stickland

Published in association with the Natural History Museum (one of our favourite places to hang out), dinosaurs of every shape, size and colour feature in this fantastic picture book. We take it in turns to do our very own dinosaur squeak or roar and usually end up with a good stomp around the house…

See our activity page here 

…which leads me to Stomp, Chomp, Big Roars! Here Come the Dinosaurs! By Kaye Umanksy & Nick Sharratt. With its bright illustrations and fantastic rhyming story, it’s perfect for stomping, chomping toddlers. We name the dinosaurs, talk about their different shapes, sizes and colours, and make our very own T-Rex stomp and roar about (when he’s not busy reading).

See our activity page here 

Dinosaurs and all that rubbish by Michael Foreman is a classic tale that introduces the concept of the environment, what we do with our rubbish and saving the planet. We talk a lot about where water comes from, where rubbish goes, for example. Freddie enjoys sorting the recycling (along with T-Rex), switches off lights whenever they’re on “to save energy, Mummy,” and loves helping to plant seeds in the garden and water the plants we’re growing.

See our activity page here 

If I Had a Dinosaur by Alex Barrow & Gabby Dawnay is a recent addition to our collection and we love it. Imagine having a dinosaur?! It’s such a fun story that inspires us to talk about what we’d do with a dinosaur in our house. Would he fit into the kitchen? Where would he sleep? What would he eat? The dinosaur poo page always gets a big laugh and imagining what our dinosaur would look like has inspired Freddie to draw her (it’s a her, she’s called ‘Marie’)

Here are some other Dinosaur books we love:

T-Veg (the story of a carrot crunching dinosaur) by Smriti Prasadam-Halls & Katherina Manolessou, Ten Terrible Dinosaurs by Paul Stickland, Dinosaur Beach by Frann Preston-Gannon, Dino Diggers Digger Disaster by Rose Impey & Chris Chatterton and Toot Goes to Dinosaurland by Catherine and Laurence Anholt. Happy Reading!



 

Sarah Baker is a children’s author. Her novel for 8-12 year olds, Through the Mirror Door, is available now.

Website:         bysarahbaker.com

Twitter:           @bysarahbaker

Instagram:      @bysarahbaker

Pinterest:        pinterest.com/bysarahbaker

 

Our top 10 counting books

Counting books offer lots of fun opportunities for learning about numbers and counting.

elmer counting bookElmer’s First Counting Book  David McKee
Andersen Press
Age 0-3

In this bright and attractive elephant shaped counting book children will meet Elmer and some of his friends. Count the animals on each page and talk about what they are all doing.
See lovemybooks ideas for sharing the first story about Elmer.

alpphaprintsAlphaprints 123  Roger Priddy
Priddy Books
Age 0-5

A board book with lovely textured animal pictures made from finger prints. It would be fun to make your own using finger paint. Includes numbers up to ten and a counting rhyme on every page.

Count to 100  Felicity BrooksSophia Touliatou (Illus)
Usborne
Age 3-7

This is a very attractive book with gorgeous illustrations to count on every page including flowers, animals, and the night sky: from one full moon to 100 twinkling stars. Young readers are encouraged to count in ones up to twenty and then introduced to whole tens (30, 40, 50 etc) to 100.

In addition to the counting on every page other concepts are introduced (eg first and last, lowest and highest) and there is plenty to spot, ‘I’m the biggest [animal]’ says the whale which is the smallest? Every double page provides lots to talk about together. Readers are encouraged to voice preferences – which flower do you prefer?

Watch the publisher’s introduction to the book: 

Count with little fish Lucy Cousins
Walker
Age 0-3

This is a perfect first counting book for the very young. The illustrations of the different fish (thin fish, fat fish, shy fish and scary fish) are beautiful, brightly coloured and patterned and might inspire some ‘fishy’ painting. Numbers are included as words and numerals. There is a pleasing rhyme to the text making it tuneful to read aloud and return to.

 

one gorilla

Gorilla Anthony Browne
Walker Books
Age 0-5

Anthony Browne is one of our most successful picture book makers. Most of his books are for over sevens and if you know his work you will recognise that gorillas often feature. In this beautiful counting book with detailed illustrations a broad family of primates are the focus.

A Million Dots, Sven Völker
Cicada Books
Age 7-11

This book takes its readers from one to a million in twenty dramatic double page spreads.

Each spread includes numbers represented in digits and words, and sums which take you to the next page where the first challenge is to read the next number. The focus is on doubling and the speed with which you reach over a million is mind boggling. Parents and children will find themselves competing to see who can calculate the next number.

The illustrations highlight all that could (potentially!) be counted in the world around us from the number of apples on a tree, to the numbers of freckles on a face moving on to all that probably could not be counted such as the number of blades of grass on a sports field or stars in the sky. Children can be encouraged to look out for other examples in the world around them.

The design is bold and attractive and the final spread is an extra delight, a gatefold page emphasising the magnitude of the final number (1,048,576!)

hungry caterpillar thumbThe Very Hungry Caterpillar Eric Carle
Penguin
Age 0-5

A picture book classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar tells the story of a rather greedy little caterpillar searching for food. Children can count the foods the caterpillar nibbles through as well as learning about the life cycle of a butterfly, the days of the week and healthy eating.
See lovemybooks ideas for sharing The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

five little menFive Little Men in a Flying Saucer Dan Crisp (illus)
Child’s Play
Age 0-3

This is an illustrated version of the well-known rhyming song with holes for little fingers to explore. Great for joining in and counting the illustrations build a story alongside the rhyme.
See lovemybooks ideas for sharing Five Little Men in a Flying Saucer.Hippos go Berserk age 3-5 Sandra Boynton Simon and Schuster

one moose twenty miceOne Moose Twenty Mice Stella Blackstone and Clare Beaton
Barefoot Books
Age 3-5

A counting book with numbers up to 20. The lovely images are created from felt applique. As well as counting the animals there is fun to be had in spotting the cat hiding on every page.

countablockCountablock Christopher Franceschelli
Abrams Appleseed
Age 3-7

Beautifully designed, the thick pages of this book are cut into number shapes. Peep through to see what’s coming next. As well as a counting book there are transformations to discover with one egg becoming one chicken and two snowmen become two puddles. Numbers up to 100.

Hippos go Berserk  Sandra Boynton
Simon and Schuster
Age 3-5

First published in 1977, this tale of a hippo preparing for a party with groups of friends, helpers and an unexpected monster guest arriving is great fun. The groups of hippos can be counted as they arrive; with older children you might attempt a running total of the hippo arrivals. There is a climax midway through the book as the party gets going and the hippos go… berserk! This appears an all-night party and the next morning they gradually leave, so you can count down until one hippo is left all alone again.



Ten Fat Sausages 
Michelle Robinson, Tor Freeman (illus)
Andersen Press
Age 3-7

The ten fat sausages in this version include some rebels who refuse to comply with expectations. Disrupting the traditional rhyme, they try to escape before going ‘pop’ or ‘bang’. However their plans are thwarted when they each meet an equally awful fate within the kitchen. Definitely a case of out of the frying pan into the fire. Magnificently macabre with humour which will delight many children, this is not a book for the faint hearted! The illustrations are very striking with very expressive sausages and a rhyming text which skips along. As well as introducing the idea of subtracting twos this book would be great fun to read together – with one of you as narrator and the other as one of the would be escapees. You could have fun with dramatic sound effects. It may inspire more sausage storytelling with other bids for freedom.

Watch a trailer


Watch an animation of the original rhyme from the BBC website

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNNBHQTfb8k

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our top 10 apps

There are an increasing number of apps with interactive stories based on children’s’ books available. These provide another way for you to share books with your children and lead to lots of opportunity to talk about the stories and activities together.

For more discussion and ideas about reading on screen see here.

Several of the apps listed here link with books included on the lovemybooks site.

me booksMe Books
Age 0-7

Me Books is a library of stories with an increasing number from new picture books as well as older books and traditional stories. The range includes books suitable for children from 0-7.

Listen to the stories read aloud, tap a character to hear what they say or create hotspots with your child and record their own voices helping to tell the stories. Look out for some lovemybooks stories including Aaaarrgghh Spider by Lydia Monks, The Gigantic Turnip and Not Now Bernard or discover new favourites for example Banana! by Ed Vere for 0-3s or Hugless Douglas by David Melling for 3-5s.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/me-books-books-comics-bedtime/id534499518?mt=8

hat monkeyHat Monkey [Fox and Sheep GmbH] created by Chris Haughton
Age 0-5

This is a stand-alone app which encourages children to interact with hat monkey in a series of scenes, an appealing character, sending him texts, feeding him bananas or dancing with him. Children will enjoy this interactive book much more if they know the story Oh No, George!  where the monkey is seen reading in one scene. See our ideas for sharing Oh No George! in the animals section. This will also lead you and your children to discover more Chris Haughton books including A Bit Lost, Shh! we have a plan.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/hat-monkey/id904565251?mt=8

pigeonDon’t let the pigeon run this app! [Disney] designed by Mo Willems
Age 3-7

Children will love this app much more if they have met Mo Willems character Pigeon in the hilarious story ‘Don’t let the pigeon drive the bus!’

In this interactive app using shake and play technology children can learn to draw a pigeon like Mo’s and create and record their own stories about the pigeon.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/dont-let-pigeon-run-this-app!/id459749670?mt=8

heart and bottleThe Heart and the Bottle for ipad [Harper Collins] designed by Oliver Jeffers
Age 5-7

An interactive app version of Oliver Jeffers poignant story about a little girl whose life changes after her grandfather dies and how she gradually learns to cope with this. Children can listen to the story read aloud and follow the hints to bring the beautiful illustrations to life; creating a snow flurry or turning day into night.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/heart-bottle-for-ipad/id407795360?mt=8

nursery rhymesNursery Rhymes with StoryTime [ustwo Ltd and Atomic Antelope]
Age 0-5

A beautifully designed interactive app with a number of well-known rhymes. Listen to the rhymes read aloud or tell them your selves as you enjoy the images and touch the screen to make the three blind mice squeak or the Grand old duke of York’s men tumble down the hill.
https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/nursery-rhymes-storytime/id423322533?mt=8

three little pigsThe Three Little Pigs a 3D fairy tale [Nosy Crow]
Age 3-7

An award winning animated version of the well-known story narrated by children. Lots of surprises and touch points in every scene. Children can join in with the wolf blowing down the 3 little pigs’ houses and read or tell the story themselves.
http://nosycrow.com/apps/the-three-little-pigs

Goldilocks and Little Bear
Age 3-7

This prize winnning story app includes two versions of the familiar classic story Goldilocks and the Three Bears. While Goldilocks is in the bears’ cottage, eating porridge, sitting in their chairs, and sleeping in their beds, Little Bear is in Goldilocks’s house eating their pancakes,trying on their clothes and reading their books.

Children can learn to navigate, select scenes, scroll, tap, and swipe and shake to animate the characters. They will enjoy helping Goldilocks taste porridge, collect berries and jump on the beds and break baby bear’s chair.  

A highly enjoyable well designed and interactive story app.

http://nosycrow.com/apps/goldilocks-and-little-bear/

gruffaloGruffalo Games [Magic light Pictures Ltd based on The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler]
Age 3-7

Gruffalo Games is for children who know and love the story of the Gruffalo. See lovemybooks ideas on sharing The Gruffalo. The app contains 6 games interactive games based on characters and scenes in the story.
http://www.magiclightpictures.com/family_brands/
the_gruffalo/apps/gruffalo_games/

hungry caterpillarThe Very Hungry Caterpillar and friends  [Story Toys Entertainment Ltd with Eric Carle’s original artwork]
Age 3-5

This app will be more fun for children who are very familiar with The Very Hungry Caterpillar story. See lovemybooks ideas for sharing The Very Hungry Caterpillar with your child.

Using Eric Carle’s original artwork this app includes animation and a number of games and activities linked to his stories and characters.
http://storytoys.com/apps/the-very-hungry-caterpillar/

goodnightGoodnight, Goodnight Construction Site  [Oceanhouse Media book by Sherry Duskey Rinker and Tom Lichtenheld]
Age 3-5


Listen to the beautifully illustrated animation of Rinker and Lichtenheld’s rhyming picture book about construction vehicles at night time read aloud. Children can then record themselves telling the story.
https://itunes.apple.com/app/goodnight-goodnight-construction/id926597014?mt=8

 

Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion

Alex T Smith
Scholastic
Age 5-7 years

In a delightful twist on the Red Riding Hood story, a very hungry lion is no match for Little Red. Set in a vibrant African landscape with gazelles and elephants, Little Red lives with her daddy and sets off to visit her auntie to take her medicine when she is ill. On her journey she travels over sleepy crocodiles, catches a lift on an elephant and meets a lion on the way who plans to eat her. But he has underestimated Little Red who decides to teach the lion a thing or two.

This is a very funny story with an assertive heroine. You and your child will have great fun sharing the story and looking closely at the details in the fabulous colourful illustrations; the double page picture of the lion with his hair braided is hilarious.

Children may make their own connections to the traditional story as you begin the book, but they can enjoy Little Red without knowing it. You could tell them the Little Red Riding story afterwards or show them the version in our find out more section below.  

lovemybooksactivitiesorangecentre

Before starting to read the story aloud 
Look at the cover together. Have a chat about what this story might be about and the clues in the pictures. Children might notice the connection to the Little Red Riding Hood story.

Read the story aloud
Pause when your child wants to look more closely at illustrations or talk about what’s happening.

Join in
Encourage your child to follow the arrows showing Little Red’s journey with a finger over the page. Children could join in with some of the phrases eg  ‘under the giraffes’, ‘over the sleepy crocodiles’ and they could use their finger again to follow the numbered steps in the lion’s cunning plan.

Talk about the story

  • Talk about your favourite or funniest parts of the story.

  • Look back at some of the illustrations – there are lots of details to spot for example did you both notice the lion hiding behind a tree watching Little Red as she moves through the forest?

  • Talk about what might happen next if there was another story about Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion?

Little Red and the very hungry lion

We acted out the story with puppets one evening

We were very excited by the cover of this book; we loved the illustrations with the expressions on their faces and the lion’s huge hair and Little Reds tiny arms. We talked about the name ‘Little red’ and Lizzie was sure it was nothing to do with red riding hood as it wasn’t a wolf, she did become convinced of a link when things were packed into a basket. Lizzie loves books where she you are meant to  touch the pages so she enjoyed following the journey through the jungle with her finger and naming the different animals.

The colours used on the pages were just so vibrant and fun that it is a treat to read and you want to turn the book to see the pictures as much as see the story develop. She really enjoyed the hand written plan as this is not something, she has seen in picture books before and enjoys the arrows which she used to retell the plan.

We spent a lot of time looking and marvelling at the lion’s hair and loved the huge page with the dirty teeth (teeth definitely got brushed well on days we read this book). Lizzie has really started to add expression to her reading so books like this that use larger or different fonts really help her when she joins in. Her favourite part is the very last line which she enjoys joining in with. We have just got a kitten who is a delight but jumps up onto tables etc and is very interested in our food so Lizzie absolutely loves the last line of the books and loves giggling at the kitten saying ‘No, Bad kitty!’

It is a really engaging book with loads of opportunities for discussion and engagement and we have enjoyed reading and re-reading it.

We had a look at the activities and decided we would make our own jungle to tell the story. We managed to find most of the animals or some excellent substitutes and use them to retell the story. We did it a few times, adding details and enjoying the different ways of moving around and adding animal noises. We then left the physical story map on the rug and little brother played with the animals and the termite mounds making up his own stories and roleplay.

We decided to do the painting activity next. We had some charcoal and inspired by the book we coloured in some animal silhouettes and used them to add to some paintings. Lizzie really enjoyed using a small range of colours and blending the colours together and it was a really lovely activity that we enjoyed doing together. It also produced some really effective and distinctive art work which we are both proudly displaying in the kitchen.

We wanted to play a game next so had a lovely time sneaking up on each other pretending to be little red and the lion. Next time they wanted a lion costume and to play it outside hiding behind trees.

We finished off with a little think about what red should have packed in her basket.

We thought the lions hair was very funny and enjoyed the opporutinty to have a go at doing a lions hair. Lizzie cut some hair out and then deicded lots of bows and clops would make the lion cross.

The whole family really enjoyed this fabulous book and had a lot of fun with the great range of activities. Great book and great fun exploring the book more through role play, art, games, writing and drawing.

Things to make and do

Make the story world
Use a large space inside or out to create Little Red’s journey using construction kits and small figures to represent the different animals and people or make small figures from recycled card with the base folded so they stand up. Look back at the book together and talk about what to include.

Tell the story
Use your story world to tell the story together. With one small figure as Little Red take her on her journey from home to Auntie’s house past the pool, the trees and animals on the way narrating the story .. Don’t forget to pause for a rest so the lion can approach her!

Play a game
With one of you as the lion and the other as Little Red ‘asleep.’  See if the lion can creep up on Little Red without her hearing him.

Design a hairstyle and an outfit for the lion
Your child might enjoy designing their own hairstyle and outfit for the lion – plaits or ponytail or piled on top? Ribbons or bows?  What else might Little Red give him to wear?

Little Red’s emergency kit and instructions
Write Little Red’s instructions for how to deal with a hungry lion and list of essential kit (eg this might include a hairbrush or toothpaste). Your child might like to pin their instructions on a door, fence or tree.

Make a mini information book
Make little Red’s mini zig zag book about African wild animals. See the link below for information. Your child could choose a few animals from the story and write a page for each.

Paint a colourful picture
This picture book is full of ‘hot colours’ reds, oranges, pinks. Your child might like to paint their own picture of a hot place like Little Red’s world using these colours.


Find out more

Watch an animation of Little Red Riding Hood from Oxbridge Baby

Another version
For another take on the story of Red Riding Hood see The Last Wolf by Mini Grey 

Find out about animals
There are lots of African animals mentioned in the story including meerkats and gazelles as well as elephants and giraffes. See here

Read more books by Alex T Smith. Titles include

Claude series inc Claude and the City

Mr Penguin series inc Mr Penguin and the Lost Treasure

How Winston Delivered Christmas

Foxy and Egg

 

 

NEW Complete list of books and activity pages

Here’s a complete list of all our book activity pages – click on the link and it will take you to the activity page

V = Video
AB = Activity Book

A

Aaaarrgghh Spider Lydia Monks  V

The Acorn Edward Gibbs       

Albert Talbot Master of Disguise Ben Manley, illus. Aurélie Guillerey   V

Alfie Gets in first Shirley Hughes  V      

Almost Anything  Sophy Henn                

The Animal Boogie Debbie Harter  V        

The Astounding Broccoli Boy Frank Cottrell Boyce, illus. Steve Lenton   AB 

Avocado Baby John Burningham  

B


The Bad Bunnies Magic Show Mini Grey

Banana! Ed Vere  V 

Bear and Bird Jarvis V

The Bear and the Piano David Litchfield  V

Bear Shaped Dawn Coulter-Cruttenden   V

Beetle Boy  MG Leonard  V  AB             

Be Brave Little Penguin Giles Andrae, illus. Guy Parker Rees

Beegu  Alexis Deacon             

Betty goes Bananas  Steve Antony  V   

Big Green Crocodile  Jane Newberry, illus. Carolina Rabei  V

A Big Mooncake for Little Star Grace Lin V

The BFG Roald Dahl    AB               

Billy and the Beast Nadia Shireen  V           

Billy’s Bucket  Kes Gray, llus Garry Parsons  V

Biscuit Bear Mini Grey  V                 

A Bit Lost Chris Haughton   V        

Black Cat White Cat Silvia Borando            

Blue Chameleon Emily Gravett    

Bog Baby   Jeanne Willis, ill. Gwen Millward

Boot: Small Robot Big Adventure Shane Hegarty   AB       

Boundless Sky Amanda Addison, illus. Manuela Adreani

The Boy at the Back of the Class Onjali Rauf, illus. Pippa Curnick   AB

The Boy who Climbed into the Moon David Almond    AB

The Boy who Sailed the World Julia Green, illus. Alex Latimer

Brown Bear Brown Bear, What Do You See?   Bill Martin Jnr, illus Eric Carle

Buckle and Squash and the Monstrous Moat Dragon Sarah Courtauld

Burglar Bill  Allan Ahlberg, illus  Janet Ahlberg  V

C

Car, Car, Truck, Jeep  Katrina Charman, illus. Nick Sharratt  V

Can I Sit in the Middle Susanne Strasser V

Charlotte’s Web EB White  V    AB                

The Chinese Emperor New Clothes  Ying Yang Competine, illus David Roberts  V   AB

Chocolate cake Michael Rosen, illus Kevin Waldron  V

The Christmas Eve Tree Delia Huddy,  illus Emily Sutton  

Cinderella of the Nile Beverley Naidoo  V   AB

Clean up!  Nathan Bryon, illus. Dapo Adeola

Clever Polly & the Stupid Wolf  Catherine Storr   

The Comet Joe Todd Stanton

The Cooking Club Detectives  Ewa Jozefkowicz

Coyote’s Soundbite – a poem for our planet  John Agard, illus. Piet Grobler    AB

The Crocodile who didn’t like water Gemma Merino   V     

D

The Darkest Dark Chris Hadfield, illus The Fan Brothers  V

The Dawn Chorus Suzanne Barton

Dear Dinosaur Chae Strathie, Nicola O’Byrne

Dear Zoo Rod Campbell             

Dig dig digging Margaret Mayo, illus Alex Ayliffe  V

Diggersaurs Michael Whaite  V         

Dinosaur chase Benedict Blathwayt    

Dinosaur roar Paul Strickland, illus Henrietta Strickland

Dinosaurs and all that rubbish  Michael Foreman  V     

Do not enter the monster zoo Amy Sparkes, illus Sara Ogilvie

Don’t worry little crab  Chris Haughton

A Dog So Small Philippa Pearce   V        

Dogger Shirley Hughes  V   

A Dollop of Ghee and a Drop of Wisdom   Chitra Soundar, illus. Uma Krishnaswamy V

Down by the station Jess Stockham

The Dragon in the Library, Louie Stowell

Dragon Mountain  Katie and Kevin Tsang  V   AB

The Drum  Ken Wilson Max, illus Catell Ronca   V

Dylan’s amazing dinosaurs EJ Harper, illus Dan Taylor

E

Each Peach Pear Plum  Allan Ahlberg, illus Janet Ahlberg   V

The Elephants umbrella Laleh Jaffari,  illus Ali Khodai    V

Eliot Midnight Superhero Anne Cottringer, illus Alex T Smith

Elmer David McKee  V

Eloise Undercover Sarah Baker    AB        

The Everywhere Bear Julia Donaldson, illus Rebecca Cobb

The Explorer  Katherine Rundell   AB   

The Extraordinary Gardener Sam Boughton   V  

Everybody’s Welcome Patricia Hegarty, illus Greg Abbott

F

Fair Shares Pippa Goodhart, illus Anna Doherty

Farmer Duck Martin Waddell, illus Helen Oxenbury

The Fastest Tortoise in Town Howard Calvert, ill. Karen Obuhanych

Fire Fox  Alexandra Page, illus. Stef Murphy   V

The Firework Maker’s Daughter  Philip Pullman   AB

Five little men in a flying saucer Dan Crisp    V               

Five Minutes Peace Jill Murphy                 

Flora and Ulysses, the illuminated adventures Kate Camillo     V   AB

Flooded Mariajo Ilustrajo V

The Forgettery Rachel Ip, ill. Laura Hughes   

Fortunately the Milk Neil Gaiman, illus Chris Riddell

Frindleswylde, Natalia and Lauren O’Hara

Gaspard the Fox  Zeb Soanes, illus. James Mayhew

G

Gerald the lion Jessica Souhami          

The Ghost train Allan Ahlberg, illus Andre Amstutz   V

Gigantic Rob Biddulph V

The Gigantic Turnip Alexsei Tolstoy, illus Naimh Sharkey  V

Giraffes Can’t Dance  Giles Andreae, Guy Parker Rees    V 

The Girl and the dinosaur Hollie Hughes, illus Sarah Massini  

Gloria’s Porridge  Elizabeth Laird, illus. Toby Newsome

The Glassmaker’s Daughter Diane Hofmeyr, Illus Jane Reay  V

Goodbye Grandma Melanie Walsh           

Goodnight Spaceman Michelle Robinson, illus Nick East   V

Grace and Family  Mary Hoffman, illus Caroline Binch   V

Granpa John Burningham   V    

A Great Big Cuddle Michael Rosen, illus Chris Riddell   V

Grobblechops Elizabeth Laird, illlus Jenny Lucander   V

The Gruffalo  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Grumpy Frog  Ed Vere    V       

H

   

The Hairy toe Daniel Postgate   V

Halima Superhero Princess Emily Joof, illus. Asa Gilland V

Handas surprise Eileen Browne  V         

Hairy MacLary from Donaldson’s Dairy, Lynley Dodd  V

Harry and the bucket of dinosaurs Ian WhyBrow, illus Adrian Reynolds

Have you seen Elephant David Barrow V

Here come the aliens Colin McNaughton   

The Highwayman Alfred Noyes   V   AB

The Highway Rat  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler   V

Honey biscuits  Meredith Hooper, illus Alison Bartlett

Hooray for Fish Lucy Cousins   V

Hooray for Bread  Allan Ahlberg, illus  Brice Ingman

Hortense and the Shadows O’Hara Sisters             

How to hide a lion Helen Stephens   V      

I

I am Absolutely TOO Small for school Lauren Child    V           

I am Henry Finch Alexis Deacon             

I Love you Blue Kangaroo Emily Gravett    V         

I want to be in a scary story Sean Taylor                

I was made for you David Lucas                

If I had a dinosaur Gabby Dawnay, illus Alex Barrow

If I Had a Sleepy Sloth Gabby Dawnay, illus Alex Barrow

If you meet a dinosaur Paul Bright, illus Hannah George

In the dark dark wood Jessica Souhami   

Iris and Isaac Catherine Rayner V

The Iron Man Ted Hughes    AB   

J

 The Jasmine Sneeze  Nadine Kaadan

Jolly Christmas Postman Allan Ahlberg, illus Janet Ahlberg   V

The Journey Home Frann Preston Gannon

Julian is a mermaid Jessica Lowe

The Jumblies Edward Lear  V    AB 

          

K

Katie & the dinosaurs James Mayhew           

The King who Banned the Dark Emily Haworth Booth

The King With Dirty Feet  Sally Pomme Clayton, illus. Rhiannon Sanderson

Kipper’s Birthday Mick Inkpen    V             

Knuffle Bunny Mo Willem    V     

L

The Last Wolf Mini Grey  

Last: The Story of the White Rhino Nicola Davies   V

Leon the Extraordinary Jamar Nicholas V

The Lighthouse Keeper’s Lunch Ronda and David Armitage V

Lima’s Red Hot Chilli David Mills, ill. Derek Brazell V

The Lion Inside Rachel Bright   

Little Bad Man and the Killer Aunties Humza Arshad and Henry White,  Illus Aleksei Bitskoff   V   AB

Little Monkey  Marta Altés 

Little Mouse’s Big Book of Fears Emily Gravett  

Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion Alex T Smith   

LIttle Rabbit Foo Foo Michael Rosen, Arthur Robins (illus) 

The Littlest Yak Lu Fraser, ill. Kate Hindley     V

Look Up! Nathan Bryon, illus Dapo Adeola

Lost and Found Oliver Jeffers              

Lullabyhullababboo Mick Inkpen               

Lulu gets a cat Anna McQuinn, illus Rosalind Beardshaw

The Lumberjack’s beard  Duncan Beedie           

Luna Loves library day Joseph Coelho, illus Fiona Lumbers

Lunchtime Rebecca Cobb  

M

Macavity T S Eliot    V   AB       

Man on the Moon, a Day in the life of Bob  Simon Bartram           

Mango and Bambang, The Not-a-Pig  Polly Faber, illlus Clara Vulliamy

The Marvellous Moon Map Teresa Heapy, illus David Litchfield

Matisse’s Magical Trail Tim Hopgood, illus Sam Boughton

Max the Brave Ed Vere

Maybe… Chris Haughton V

Meg and Mog Helen Nicholl ,illus Jan Pienkwski

Miró’s Magic Animals Antony Penrose V

Mister Magnolia Quentin Blake            

Meet the Parents Peter Bently, illus Sara Ogilvie

Mog the Forgetful Cat Judith Kerr                 

Monkey and Me Emily Gravett             

Mr Bunny’s Chocolate Factory Elys Dolan                  

Mr Gumpy’s Outing John Burningham       

Mrs Noah’s pockets Jackie Morris, illus James Mayhew

My Brother is a Superhero David Solomons   AB

My Dad Anthony Browne        

My Green Day Melanie Walsh   

My Must-Have Mum   Maudie Smith, illus. Jen Khatun

My Sister is an alien Rachel Bright    

          

N

Naughty Bus Jan and Jerry Oke       

A New House for Mouse Petr Horacek              

The New Neighbours Sarah McIntyre           

The New Small Person Lauren Child               

The Night Pirates Peter Harris, illus Deborah Allwright

Nimesh the Adventurer Ranjit Singh, illus Mehrdokht Amini

No Dinner Jessica Souhami          

Not Now Bernard David McKee     

         

O

The Odd Egg Emily Gravett             

Oh No George! Chris Haughton           

Oi! Get off our train John Burningham       

Oliver’s Vegetables Vivian French, illus  Alison Bartlett

On Sudden Hill Linda Sarah, illus Benji Davies

On the Moon Anna Milbourne, illus Benji Davies

Once upon a star  James Carter, illus Mar Hernandez

One dog and his boy Eva Ibbotson      AB        

Orange Pear Apple Bear  Emily Gravett             

Ottoline and the Yellow Cat Chris Riddell               

The Outlaw Varjak Paw SF Said      V    AB               

The Owl and the Pussycat Edward Lear  

P

             

Pandora  Victoria Turnbull         

The Paper Dolls  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Pattan’s pumpkin  Chitra Soundar, illus Frane Lessac

Peace at Last  Jill Murphy                 

Peck Peck Peck Lucy Cousins 

Phoenix S F Said    V     AB

Pirate Stew   Neil Gaiman, illus. Chris Riddell   V

Please Mr Magic Fish Jessica Souhami          

Please Mr Panda Steve Antony              

Pom Pom is Super Sophy Henn   
  
The Princess and the Greedy Pea , Leigh Hodgkinson 

Pugs of the Frozen North  Philip Reeve, illus Sarah McIntyre

Puppet David Almond, illus Lizzie Stewart AB

Pumpkin Soup Helen Cooper             

Q


Quiet Tom Percival, ill. Richard Jones V

Quill Soup Alan Durant   

Q Pootle 5 Nick Butterworth       

             

R

Rama & the Demon King Jessica Souhami          

Red Car Red Bus  Susan Stegall 

Rigatoni the Pasta Cat  Michael Rosen, Illus. Tony Ross

Robin’s Winter Song  Suzanne Barton          

Rocketmole  Matt Carr                   

Room on the Broom Julia Donaldson, Illus Axel Scheffler

Rosie’s Walk Pat Hutchins  

S

   

The Secret Sky Garden Linda Sarah  

Saving Winslow Sharon Creech  AB

Secret of the Tattered Shoes Jackie Morris, illus. Ehsan Abdollahi    V    AB

Shark in the park Nick Sharrat  

Shhh!   Sally Grindley, illus. Peter Upton

Shh we have a plan Chris Haughton           

Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam Tracey Corderoy, illus Steven Lenton

The Skull Jon Klassen V

Silly Suzy Goose Petr Horacek              

The Snail and the Whale  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Snow  Sam Usher                 

The Snowbear Sean Taylor 

The Snowflake Benji Davies     

So Much Trisha Cooke, illus Helen Oxenbury

The Something Rebecca Cobb

Sona Sharma, Looking After Planet Earth  Chitra Soundar, illus Jen Khatun    AB      

Sophie and the new Baby Catherine & Laurence Anholt

Space Dog Mini Grey                   

Space Tortoise  Ross Montgomery, illlus David Litchfield

Stanley’s Stick  John Hegley, illus Neal Layton

Steven Seagull Action Hero Elys Dolan                  

Stomp Chomp Big Roars! Here come the Dinosaurs Margaret Mayo, illus Alex Ayliffe

Stomp Dinosaur Stomp Kate Umansky, illus Nick Sharratt

Stop the Clock  Pippa Goodhart, illus. Maria Christiana V

The Storm Whale Benji Davies               

A Story about Afiya James Berry, illus Anna Cunha                                                                                                               

Sunk! Rob Biddulph             

Superbat Matt Carr    

SuperJoe does not do cuddles Michael Catchpool, illus. Emma Proctor

Super Milly and the Super School Day  Stephanie Clarkson, illus. Gwen Millward    V 

T

Tad Benji Davies               

The Tale of Angelino Brown David Almond       AB     

10 things I can do to help my world Melanie Walsh 

Ten Delicious Teachers   Ross Montgomery, illus. Sarah Warburton V

The Three Happy Lions  Louise Fatio, illus. Roger Duvoisin

Tilly and the Time Machine Ade Edmondson, illustrated by Danny Noble    

That rabbit belongs to Emily Brown Cressida Cowell          

There’s a rang tan in my bedroom  James Sellick, illus Frann Preston-Gannon

There’s a tiger in the garden Lizzy Stewart V

This is Our House Michael Rosen, illus Bob Graham

The Thunk Michelle Robinson, illus. Deborah Allwright

Tidy Emily Gravett             

Tiger Walk Dianne Hofmeyr, illus Jesse Hodgson

The Tiger who came to Tea Judith Kerr                 

The Tin Forest  Helen Ward, illus Wayne Anderson

Titch  Pat Hutchins     

Tomorrow Nadine Kaadan          

Tom’s Sausage Lion Michael Morpurgo      AB

Toys in space  Mini Grey                   

Traction man  is here!  Mini Grey                   

Train  Judi Abott                  

The Train Ride June Crebbin, illus Stephen Lambert

Tyger SF Said, iIllus Dave McKean V AB

Tyrranosaurus Drip Julia Donaldson   

 

U

Uncle Gobb and the Dread shed Michael Rosen, illus Neal Layton

V

Valentine’s Guest House Sam Sharland V

Varjak Paw  SF Said      AB               

The Velveteen Rabbit Margery Williams, illus William Nicholson V

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Eric Carle   

           

W

The Way Back Home Oliver Jeffers   

The Weed Quentin Blake           

We’re going on a Bearhunt Michael Rosen, illus Helen Oxenbury

We’re Going to Find the Monster Malorie Blackman, illus. Dapo Adeola   V

What the Ladybird Heard Julia Donaldson, illus Lydia Monks

Whatever Next Jill Murphy                 

The Wheels on the Bus Annie Kubler

Where my feet go Birgitta Sif                  

Where the Wild Things Are  Maurice Sendak          

Where’s my Teddy? Jez Alborough             

Where’s Spot? Eric Hill                      

Window Jeannie Baker    

When the Sky Falls Phil Earle V AB

The Wolf Wilder  Katherine Rundell     V    AB

The Wooden camel Wanuri Kahiu, illus Manuela Adreani

Y

You’re snug with  me Chitra Soundar

Z

The Zebra’s Great Escape Katherine Rundell, ill. Sara Ogilvie V AB

Zombierella Fairy Tales Gone Bad Joseph Coelho, illus. Freya Hartas  V   AB                                                     

NEW Complete list of books and activity pages

Here’s a complete list of all our book activity pages – click on the link and it will take you to the activity page

   

Aaaarrgghh Spider Lydia Monks  V

The Acorn Edward Gibbs                                                                                                                                  

Alfie Gets in first Shirley Hughes  V      

Almost Anything  Sophy Henn                

The Animal Boogie Debbie Harter  V        

The Astounding Broccoli Boy Frank Cottrell Boyce, illus. Steve Lenton  AB 

Avocado Baby John Burningham       

The Bad Bunnies Magic Show Mini Grey

Bear Shaped Dawn Coulter-Cruttenden   V

Beatle Boy  MG Leonard  V  AB             

Beegu  Alexis Deacon             

Betty goes Bananas  Steve Antony  V          

The BFG Roald Dahl                 

Billy and the Beast Nadia Shireen  V           

Billy’s Bucket  Kes Gray, llus Garry Parsons  V

Biscuit Bear Mini Grey  V                 

A Bit Lost Chris Haughton   V        

Black Cat White Cat Silvia Borando            

Blue Chameleon Emily Gravett             

Boot: Small Robot Big Adventure Shane Hegarty   AB         

The Boy who Climbed into the Moon David Almond             

Brown Bear Brown Bear, What Do You See?   Bill Martin Jnr, illus Eric Carle

Buckle and Squash and the Monstrous Moat Dragon Sarah Courtauld

Burglar Bill  Allan Ahlberg, illus  Janet Ahlberg  V

Charlotte’s Web EB White  AB                

The Chinese Emperor New Clothes  Ying Yang Competine, illus David Roberts  V

Chocolate cake Michael Rosen, illus Kevin Waldron  V

The Christmas Eve Tree Delia Huddy,  illus Emily Sutton  

Cinderella of the Nile Beverley Naidoo  V

Clean up!  Nathan Bryon, illus. Dapo Adeola

Clever Polly & the Stupid Wolf  Catherine Storr            

The Crocodile who didn’t like water Gemma Merino   V     

The Darkest Dark Chris Hadfield, illus The Fan Brothers  V

The Dawn Chorus Suzanne Barton

Dear Dinosaur Chae Strathie, Nicola O’Byrne

Dear Zoo Rod Campbell             

Dig dig digging Margaret Mayo, illus Alex Ayliffe  V

Diggersaurs Michael Whaite  V         

Dinosaur chase Benedict Blathwayt    

Dinosaur roar Paul Strickland, illus Henrietta Strickland

Dinosaurs and all that rubbish  Michael Foreman  V     

Do not enter the monster zoo Amy Sparkes, illus Sara Ogilvie

A Dog So Small Philippa Pearce   V        

Dogger Shirley Hughes           

Down by the station Jess Stockham

The Drum  Ken Wilson Max, illus Catell Ronca

Dylan’s amazing dinosaurs EJ Harper, illus Dan Taylor

Each Peach Pear Plum  Allan Ahlberg, illus Janet Ahlberg

The Elephants umbrella Laleh Jaffari,  illus Ali Khodai

Eliot Midnight Superhero Anne Cottringer, illus Alex T Smith

Elmer David McKee

Eloise Undercover Sarah Baker             

The Everywhere Bear Julia Donaldson, illus Rebecca Cobb

The Explorer  Katherine Rundell       

Everybody’s Welcome Patricia Hegarty, illus Greg Abbott

Farmer Duck Martin Waddell, illus Helen Oxenbury

Five little men in a flying saucer Dan Crisp                   

Five Minutes Peace Jill Murphy                 

Flora and Ulysses, the illuminated adventures Kate Camillo               

Fortunately the Milk Neil Gaiman, illus Chris Riddell

Gerald the lion Jessica Souhami          

The Ghost train Allan Ahlberg, illus Andre Amstutz

The Gigantic Turnip Alexsei Tolstoy, illus Naimh Sharkey

The Girl and the dinosaur Hollie Hughes, illus Sarah Massini

Goodbye Grandma Melanie Walsh           

Goodnight Spaceman Michelle Robinson, illus Nick East

Grace and Family  Mary Hoffman, illus Caroline Binch

Granpa John Burningham       

A Great Big Cuddle Michael Rosen, illus Chris Riddell

Grobblechops Elizabeth Laird, illlus Jenny Lucander

The Gruffalo  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Grumpy Frog  Ed Vere                      

The Hairy toe Daniel Postgate

Handas surprise Eileen Browne            

Harry and the bucket of dinosaurs Ian WhyBrow, illus Adrian Reynolds

Here come the aliens Colin McNaughton   

The Highwayman Alfred Noyes   

The Highway Rat  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Honey biscuits  Meredith Hooper, illus Alison Bartlett

Hooray for Fish Lucy Cousins

Hooray for Bread  Allan Ahlberg, illus  Brice Ingman

Hortense and the Shadows O’Hara Sisters             

How to hide a lion Helen Stephens          

I am Absolutely TOO Small for school Lauren Child               

I am Henry Finch Alexis Deacon             

I Love you Blue Kangaroo Emily Gravett             

I want to be in a scary story Sean Taylor                

I was made for you David Lucas                

If I had a dinosaur Gabby Dawnay, illus Alex Barrow

If you meet a dinosaur Paul Bright, illus Hannah George

In the dark dark wood Jessica Souhami          

The Iron Man Ted Hughes                

Jolly Christmas Postman Allan Ahlberg, illus Janet Ahlberg

The Journey Home Frann Preston Gannon

Julian is a mermaid Jessica Lowe

The Jumblies Edward Lear              

Katie & the dinosaurs James Mayhew           

The King who Banned the Dark Emily Haworth Booth

Kipper’s Birthday Mick Inkpen               

Knuffle Bunny Mo Willem                 

The Last Wolf Mini Grey  

The Lion Inside Rachel Bright   

Little Bad Man and the Killer Aunties Humza Arshad and Henry White,  Illus Aleksei Bitskoff

Little Mouse’s Big Book of Fears Emily Gravett  

Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion Alex T Smith   

LIttle Rabbit Foo Foo Michael Rosen, Arthur Robins (illus)               

Look Up! Nathan Bryon, illus Dapo Adeola

Lost and Found Oliver Jeffers              

Lullabyhullababboo Mick Inkpen               

Lulu gets a cat Anna McQuinn, illus Rosalind Beardshaw

The Lumberjack’s beard  Duncan Beedie           

Luna Loves library day Joseph Coelho, illus Fiona Lumbers

Lunchtime Rebecca Cobb  

Macavity T S Eliot           

Man on the Moon, a Day in the life of Bob  Simon Bartram           

Mango and Bambang, The Not-a-Pig  Polly Faber, illlus Clara Vulliamy

The Marvellous Moon Map Teresa Heapy, illus David Litchfield

Matisse’s Magical Trail Tim Hopgood, illus Sam Boughton

Max the Brave Ed Vere                      

Meet the Parents Peter Bently, illus Sara Ogilvie

Meg and Mog Helen Nicholl ,illus Jan Pienkwski

Mister Magnolia Quentin Blake            

Mog the Forgetful Cat Judith Kerr                 

Monkey and Me Emily Gravett             

Mr Bunny’s Chocolate Factory Elys Dolan                  

Mr Gumpy’s Outing John Burningham       

Mrs Noah’s pockets Jackie Morris, illus James Mayhew

My Brother is a SuperherDavid Solomons

My Dad Anthony Browne        

My Green Day Melanie Walsh           

My Sister is an alien Rachel Bright              

Naughty Bus Jan and Jerry Oke       

A New House for Mouse Petr Horacek              

The New Neighbours Sarah McIntyre           

The New Small Person Lauren Child               

The Night Pirates Peter Harris, illus Deborah Allwright

Nimesh the Adventurer Ranjit Singh, illus Mehrdokht Amini

No Dinner Jessica Souhami          

Not Now Bernard David McKee              

The Odd Egg Emily Gravett             

Oh No George! Chris Haughton           

Oi! Get off our train John Burningham       

Oliver’s Vegetables Vivian French, illus  Alison Bartlett

On Sudden Hill Linda Sarah, illus Benji Davies

On the Moon Anna Milbourne, illus Benji Davies

Once upon a star  James Carter, illus Mar Hernandez

One dog and his boy Eva Ibbotson              

Orange Pear Apple Bear  Emily Gravett             

Ottoline and the Yellow Cat Chris Riddell               

The Outlaw Varjak Paw SF Said                       

The Owl and the Pussycat Edward Lear               

Pandora  Victoria Turnbull         

The Paper Dolls  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Pattan’s pumpkin  Chitra Soundar, illus Frane Lessac

Peace at Last  Jill Murphy                 

Peck Peck Peck Lucy Cousins 

Phoenix S F Said              

Please Mr Magic Fish Jessica Souhami          

Please Mr Panda Steve Antony              

Pom Pom is Super Sophy Henn                

Pugs of the Frozen North  Philip Reeve, illus Sarah McIntyre

Pumpkin Soup Helen Cooper             

Q Pootle 5 Nick Butterworth        

Quill Soup Alan Durant                

Rama & the Demon King Jessica Souhami          

Red Car Red Bus  Susan Stegall              

Robin’s Winter Song  Suzanne Barton          

Rocketmole  Matt Carr                   

Room on the Broom Julia Donaldson, Illus Axel Scheffler

Rosie’s Walk Pat Hutchins               

The Secret Sky Garden Linda Sarah  

Secret of the Tattered Shoes, Jackie Morris, illus. Ehsan Abdollahi

Shark in the park Nick Sharrat               

Shh we have a plan Chris Haughton           

Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam Tracey Corderoy, illus Steven Lenton

Silly Suzy Goose Petr Horacek              

The Snail and the Whale  Julia Donaldson, illus Axel Scheffler

Snow  Sam Usher                 

The Snowbear Sean Taylor                

So Much Trisha Cooke, illus Helen Oxenbury

The Something Rebecca Cobb             

Sophie and the new Baby Catherine & Laurence Anholt

Space Dog Mini Grey                   

Space Tortoise  Ross Montgomery, illlus David Litchfield

Stanley’s Stick  John Hegley, illus Neal Layton

Steven Seagull Action Hero Elys Dolan                  

Stomp Chomp Big Roars! Here come the Dinosaurs Margaret Mayo, illus Alex Ayliffe

Stomp Dinosaur Stomp Kate Umansky, illus Nick Sharratt

The Storm Whale Benji Davies               

A Story about Afiya James Berry, illus Anna Cunha                                                                                                                                                               

Sunk! Rob Biddulph             

Superbat Matt Carr                   

Tad Benji Davies               

The Tale of Angelino Brown David Almond             

10 things I can do to help my world Melanie Walsh 

Tilly and the Time Machine Ade Edmondson, illustrated by Danny Noble    

That rabbit belongs to Emily Brown Cressida Cowell          

There’s a rang tan in my bedroom  James Sellick, illus Frann Preston-Gannon

This is Our House Michael Rosen, illus Bob Graham

Tidy Emily Gravett             

Tiger Walk Dianne Hofmeyr, illus Jesse Hodgson

The Tiger who came to Tea Judith Kerr                 

The Tin Forest  Helen Ward, illus Wayne Anderson

Titch  Pat Hutchins     

Tomorrow Nadine Kaadan          

Tom’s Sausage Lion Michael Morpurgo      

Toys in space  Mini Grey                   

Traction man  is here!  Mini Grey                   

Train  Judi Abott                  

The Train Ride June Crebbin, illus Stephen Lambert

Tyrranosaurus Drip Julia Donaldson          

Uncle Gobb and the Dread shed Michael Rosen, illus Neal Layton

Varjak Paw  SF Said                       

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Eric Carle                    

The Way Back Home Oliver Jeffers   

The Weed Quentin Blake           

We’re going on a Bearhunt Michael Rosen, illus Helen Oxenbury

What the Ladybird Heard Julia Donaldson, illus Lydia Monks

Whatever Next Jill Murphy                 

The Wheels on the Bus Annie Kubler

Where my feet go Birgitta Sif                  

Where the Wild Things Are  Maurice Sendak          

Where’s my Teddy? Jez Alborough             

Where’s Spot? Eric Hill                      

Window Jeannie Baker             

The Wooden camel Wanuri Kahiu, illus Manuela Adreani

You’re safe with me Chitra Soundar           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your feedback

You can contact us using the form at the bottom of the page, by email at info@lovemybooks.co.uk, on our Facebook page or on Twitter @lovemybooksUK.

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Your comments

Here is a great new website all about reading for pleasure. Lots of recommendations, activities, tips, great advice for parents and children. It’s been created by true experts and enthusiasts, and patrons are Michael Rosen and SF Said. Fantastic for the summer holidays and beyond. Find out how to make an origami book, discover how we learn to read, send feedback, ask questions. It’s bright and brilliant and free!

David Almond, author,  via Facebook

It’s absolutely marvellous, many congratulations for getting something so bright, comprehensive, clear, easy to navigate, inspirational   – I could go on all day!

Sian Williams, Children’s Bookshow

What a fantastic website- well done- lovely graphics, easy links and great idea.

Kathy Cruise, Supervisor Family Nurse Partnership 

It’s a pleasure to see such a beautifully curated reading resource.

SF Said, author via Twitter

 Fantastic new website with TONS of great books & creative reading ideas for 0-7s!
SF Said, author via Twitter

Reading for pleasure, reading for fun: howze about this?
Michael Rosen, author and broadcaster  via Twitter

Miss G Garnett@fazakeyfs Jul 15

Have a look at for great reading ideas for children aged 0-7
Via Twitter

Alison@WoodlandAli Jul 16

Loving your website great timing for Thanks top tweet!
Via Twitter

Jul 21

Very impressed by new website from Wonderful, FREE resources for parents
Via Twitter

“I have just clicked onto LMB and LOVE it already! I have been reading The Hungry Caterpillar, The Gruffalo, Dear Zoo and other stories for the last 6 months to my son and I adore all your ideas on how to expand and develop the stories. Thank you for creating this website!”

Tamiko,  parent

My daughter (aged 2) loves the activities on your website. She can now often be seen walking round the flat, bag packed ‘going on a bear hunt’ and is turning into a real bookworm, looking at the pictures telling us the stories from her favourite books – thanks for all the creative ideas Lovemybooks!

Emma (Naomi’s mum)

Contact form

Big Green Crocodile


Jane Newberry, illus. Carolina Rabei
Otter Barry Books
Age 0-3

This is a delightful book full of rhymes which are perfect for babies and toddlers. Each rhyme is beautifully illustrated. The writer has included useful ideas for engaging your child playfully with each of the rhymes so as well as our selection of these and additional suggestions do try out the other ideas in the book too. You will soon be adding new ideas of your own to have fun with the rhymes.

lovemybooksactivitiesorangecentre

Share the story

Read Aloud
This is a book to dip into you will develop your own favourite rhymes and as you and your child become familiar with them find yourselves saying them at different times and joining in the actions together.Have fun marching and roaring like a monster as you say the first verse of ‘Monster March!’

Bounce your child on your knee as you read ‘My Camel’ and ‘Hungry Horse.’
Let older children climb on your back for an exciting ‘Brontosaurus Ride.’
Wobble together as you say the ‘Wibble-Wobble Clown.’
Pick your child up and get ready for take off in ‘Moon Rocket.’
‘Fish Tales’ is lovely for bathtime and ‘Big Green Crocodile’, which ends with ‘I lay down beside him and slept until dawn’ is perfect for bedtime. 

As well as enjoying the rhymes spend time looking at the lovely illustrations together and talking about them.

Watch Jane Newberry perform the title poem

https://vimeo.com/622456538

It was lovely to share some of the rhymes from ‘Big Green Crocodile’ by Jane Newberry. I looked at the book with Nancy aged 16 months. She prefers to be active so will not sit for long. I therefore found it easier to record some of the rhymes on my phone. This meant I could learn them off by heart and play them, singing along, while we were playing outside, or dancing along on my lap, or generally moving around.

Nancy loves being outside so the first rhyme we did was ‘Tap the tree’ We looked for a sturdy stick each and she loved holding a big stick. She thought it was hilarious when I started tapping the tree with my stick and sang the rhyme. Each time we went to the park or the woods I sang the rhyme to her and she soon learnt to tap the tree when I did so. This led to us looking for sticks to collect, and I was able to use this to develop her language skills by saying,’that ones a small stick, my stick is shorter/ thicker that yours, can you find a longer stick.’ Nancy loves posting things, so I gave her a box with various holes in and she spent a long time seeing which sticks would fit through which hole. We spent time feeling the bark of the trees, looking up at the branches and trying to climb them!

Another favourite rhyme is ‘Five Buzzy Bees’. I learnt the rhyme off by heart so I could do the actions at the same time as reciting it. A lot of the rhymes lend themselves to having Nancy on my lap. With this rhyme she sat on my lap, and I lifted her arms up and then down low, touched her head then her knees. When Nancy was more familiar with it, I said the rhyme as we danced around the room. We made headbands each and wore them as we danced, waving our arms and buzzing around. Nancy loves flap books or peek hole books, so I found some about bees which we looked at together. I talked about the pictures and Nancy enjoyed pointing and ‘naming’ things. In the garden and park, we looked at the flowers and saw and heard bees. I showed her how to keep her distance from the bees… to look and not touch. Nancy loved looking at the flowers and gently touching the petals. Again, it gave many opportunities for language development, naming the different colours and saying what the flowers felt like. We also noticed and watched other insects in the garden such as ants, flies and woodlice.

Nancy enjoyed ‘Tickle Beetle’ as she loves to be tickled, especially her toes. I used a small soft toy that looked like a cuddly insect, as I sang the rhyme. The toy ran around her tummy, jumped on her nose, ran down her leg and jumped up and down on her toes. Nancy held the toy and made it jump up and down on me as I sang the rhyme. We also used the toy to jump up and down on grandpa’s nose and tummy. We looked in the garden for insects amongst the grass and flowers. We collected bits of grass, leaves and petals in a small plastic container, and I put a ladybird in that we had found. We watched it together, and I let Nancy have it crawl on her hand. I showed her how to be gentle with it, and showed her how we must put it back in the garden after we have watched it for a while. We did some finger painting with red paint, making dots with our fingers. When it had dried we used black paint to add dots with a small brush. Nancy loves painting and mark making, but is too young to see we had made little ladybirds! She enjoyed the experience though. I sang other rhymes about insects such as ‘Ladybird, ladybird’ and ‘Incy Wincy Spider’ and Nancy enjoyed trying to join in the actions.

Another popular rhyme was ‘Hungry horse’. We sat together on the floor, and I sang the rhyme as Nancy and I played percussion instruments. Nancy loves playing music and has a variety of instruments including bongo drums. We played the rhythm faster and faster, then slower and slower. I followed Nancys lead as she led the speed of the beats. When she stopped playing, I stopped and when she started again, I started. Nancy was full of laughter as she controlled what I did. We played the beats on a xylophone, tambourine, chime bar and wood block. We also had two old coconut shell halves, used before for bird food, and clip clopped those together, dancing around the room as we did so.

Things to make and do

Out and About
Look out for bees when you say, ‘Buzzy Bee’ and beetles when you have shared ‘Tickle Beetle.’
Lie on the grass to look at the sky for some ‘Plane Spotting.’
Find a stick to ‘Tap the Tree.’

Indoors
Bake some cakes together in case ‘The Queen Comes to Tea.’
Play with a toy fish in the bath or a paddling pool when you say, ‘Fish Tales.’
Finger paint some ‘Spots and Stripes.’ or ladybirds for ‘Tickle Beetle.’
A cardboard box can make a great imaginary rocket for ‘Moon Rocket.’
Use percussion instruments or a wooden spoon and a saucepan to beat the rhythm of different rhymes such as ‘Hungry Horse.’

Find out More

Share more books by Jane Newberry
Sackful of Songs
A Sackful of Christmas

For more original rhymes see A Great Big Cuddle by Michael Rosen illustrated by Chris Riddell.